ICRA 2011 Paper Abstract

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Paper TuP207.3

Fleder, Michael (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Nesnas, Issa (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Pivtoraiko, Mihail (Carnegie Mellon University), Kelly, Alonzo (Carnegie Mellon University), Volpe, Richard (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech)

Autonomous Rover Traverse and Precise Arm Placement on Remotely Designated Targets

Scheduled for presentation during the Regular Sessions "Space Robotics" (TuP207), Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 15:55−16:10, Room 5B

2011 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 9-13, 2011, Shanghai International Conference Center, Shanghai, China

This information is tentative and subject to change. Compiled on March 30, 2020

Keywords Space Exploration Rover, Field Robots, Autonomous Navigation

Abstract

Exploring planetary surfaces typically involves traversing challenging and unknown terrain and acquiring in-situ measurements at designated locations using arm-mounted instruments. We present field results for a new implementation of an autonomous capability that enables a rover to traverse and precisely place an arm-mounted instrument on remote targets. Using point-and-click mouse commands, a scientist designates targets in the initial imagery acquired from the rover’s mast cameras. The rover then autonomously traverses the rocky terrain for a distance of 10 – 15 m, tracks the target(s) of interest during the traverse, positions itself for approaching the target, and then precisely places an arm-mounted instrument within 2-3 cm from the originally designated target. The rover proceeds to acquire science measurements with the instrument. This work advances what has been previously developed and integrated on the Mars Exploration Rovers by using algorithms that are capable of traversing more rock-dense terrains, enabling tight thread-the-needle maneuvers. We integrated these algorithms on the newly refurbished Athena Mars research rover and fielded them in the JPL Mars Yard. We conducted 43 runs with targets at distances ranging from 5 m to 15 m and achieved a success rate of 93% for placement of the instrument within 2-3 cm.

 

 

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